Indians make a bubbly assertion urging CNN to fireside Rick Santorum

The President of the National Indian Congress (NCAI) Fawn Sharp released an official response to Santorum’s grotesque. She held nothing back. Sharp began her testimony by saying that she would get to the point: “Rick Santorum is a clumsy and embarrassing racist who shames CNN and any other media company that offers him a platform. Televising someone’s views on the Native American genocide is basically nothing more than televising a direct Nazi to justify the Holocaust. “ The Native American Journalists Association issued a statement that “Strongly warns Alaskan Native American and native reporters not to work or apply for jobs at CNN due to the persistence of racist comments and insensitive reports to tribal peoples. “They also urged CNN to sack Santorum immediately, saying it was an issue of accountability and ethics in journalism.

Nick Estes, host of the Red Nation podcast and citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux tribe, wrote that this is not the first time CNN has “advocated racism against indigenous peoples.” Citing various cases of misidentifications and airborne deletions on the news coverage network, he pointed out that part of what is at stake here is our country’s ability to fully reckon with its history:

While the United States is quick to accuse other nations of genocide, it has not recognized its own genocide against the indigenous peoples. Acknowledging it would mean taking steps to prevent it from happening again. That would mean stopping the ongoing theft and destruction of indigenous countries, cultures and nations. A process of justice should follow. An entire legal system that underpins backward racist views and practices against indigenous peoples should be overturned. Indigenous land and political rights must be restored. A savage nation built of immeasurable violence should finally be civilized and make amends with the people and nations it has tried to destroy. After all, eliminating the indigenous nations was not just about taking the land, it was also about destroying an alternative – a world based on building and being good relationships as compared to that of a racial class system based on Property and conquest is based.

People like Santorum don’t just simplify history in a racist way because it suits them and it is too difficult for their little brains to deal with the chaotic complications of the story. They simplify things in the most racist way possible because they ultimately believe that their little identity is the only worthwhile story and anything that adds the slightest moral complexity to their life threatens to tear the fabric of their way of seeing the world. And they are not wrong. Their moral superiority, like almost every construct of moral superiority, is wafer-thin, and in underdeveloped theocrats like Santorum the term “faith” has less to do with belief in a Judeo-Christian God and more with “belief” in not thinking about why the world is unequal.

You can read NCAI President Fawn Sharp’s entire statement below:

Before I correct the recording, I would like to address Rick Santorum directly, without wasting words: Rick Santorum is an awkward and embarrassing racist who shames CNN and any other media company that offers him a platform. Televising someone’s views on the Native American genocide is basically nothing more than televising a direct Nazi to justify the Holocaust. Any mainstream media organization should sack him or face a boycott by more than 500 tribal nations and our allies from around the country and around the world.

Make your choice. Do you stand with or stand with white supremacists who justify the Native American genocide?

To correct the record, European colonizers found thousands of complex, highly developed, and sovereign tribal nations on the American continent, each with millennia of different cultural, spiritual, and technological developments. For millennia, they bred, cultivated, and showed the world how to use plants like cotton, rubber, chocolate, corn, potatoes, tomatoes, and tobacco. Imagine the history of the United States without the economic contributions of cotton and tobacco. It is unimaginable.

In terms of contributions to American culture, it is impossible to capture the significant influences of those of Native American ancestry. How do you quantify Will Rogers’ impact on film and popular culture? Maria Tallchief, the country’s first great prima ballerina? How do you ignore Olympic gold medalists like Jim Thorpe and Billy Mills who changed the sport forever? How ignorant do you have to be to fail to see the influence of Native American art on every imaginable facet of American culture, from architecture to furniture making to painting, sculpture, and writing?

But most importantly, how can anyone ignore what is arguably the most important philosophical development in human history: environmental protection. The concept of humans as just one animal in a complex ecosystem that must live in harmony with nature and use natural resources sustainably. No idea is more fundamentally Native American and is more explicitly propagated by Native American peoples. Without Native American influence, there would be no national park system.

Let’s say we pray to face climate change and centuries of selfish destruction of our planet. In this case, it is up to the wisdom of leaders like Tecumseh, Chief Seattle, Chief Joseph, Sitting Bull, and so many others, to burn in the minds and hearts of generations of American citizens until they eventually change the way people view the world .

Hopefully the refined and humane Native American philosophy will prevail against the caveman mentality of people like Rick Santorum. Then the survival of humanity itself will be another contribution that Native Americans made to the world. “

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