A Large 12 with out Texas, Oklahoma? One of the best convention realignment choices

What happens to the Big 12 when Oklahoma and Texas go?

This hypothetical question hit the heartland with reports being passed to the Sooners and Longhorns to the Southeastern Conference. This rumor is approaching an uncomfortable reality for the conference. The Austin-American Statesman reports that the move could become official next week.

Prominent Big 12 source tells American statesman that Texas OU’s move to SEC is almost complete. “You have been working on it for at least 6 months and the A&M leadership has been excluded from discussions and has not been informed.” The move could be official in a week.

– Kirk Bohls (@kbohls) July 23, 2021

This move, which is coming much faster than expected, would create a massive ripple effect in the college football landscape. Today Sporting News is investigating how this move would affect the Big 12.

MORE: SEC’s Greg Sankey should say “no” to Texas and Oklahoma

Which Big 12 teams are left?

If Texas and Oklahoma went, the Big 12 would be reduced to eight member schools:

  • Baylor
  • State of Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kansas state
  • State of Oklahoma
  • TCU
  • Texas Tech
  • West Virginia

Only four of these schools – Oklahoma State, Kansas, Kansas State, and Iowa State – were on the original Big Eight. It would be a big blow to lose the Sooners and Longhorns. The other eight schools have stadium capacities between 45,000 and 62,000 and Oklahoma State was the last school to win a national title in 1945.

That leaves some interesting options for the member schools:

Big 12 leftovers go to Pac-12

The Big 12 could jump on the idea of ​​a super conference and send four to eight schools to the Big 12. That would be a tough sell for West Virginia given the geography, but new Pac-12 commissioner George Kliavkoff could do with the other schools.

A soccer package with Oklahoma State, Texas Tech, TCU and Baylor would give the conference a Texas footprint. A package with Kansas, Kansas State, and Iowa State wouldn’t be all that tempting from a footballing perspective, but the Jayhawks do offer this brand of basketball.

Big 12 survives with G5

Didn’t we do that a few years ago? The Big 12 could take the losses and expand with Group of 5 schools like Cincinnati, Memphis, Houston and UCF, or even consider independent ones like BYU. This is probably the least appealing option as it would mean the Big 12 would be stuck between the Power 5 and the Group of 5, much like the American Athletic Conference that would raid them.

Then why don’t you call North Dakota State?

Big 12 could strike back at SEC

Hey, Texas A&M isn’t going to be a fan of Texas and Oklahoma on the SEC. Why don’t you call the aggies? Bring Missouri, Mississippi State and Ole Miss for why you’re there. The likelihood of this happening is minimal, and again, it would not make up for the Oklahoma and Texas losses.

What about Nebraska?

Nebraska coach Scott Frost said the program was happy with the Big Ten at Media Days this week, but the Huskers were struggling to establish their own identity in the new conference. Nebraska left the Big 12 once. Would you be willing to come back to save a conference with so many question marks?

Why won’t this work?

The Big 12 will have to convince Texas A&M, Nebraska, and maybe Colorado and Missouri to come back. That would be awkward at best. It might be better to consider a merger than a separate league.

What’s the best step any Big 12 school can take in realigning?

Baylor

The merger of Pac-12 and Big 12 would be the best scenario.

State of Iowa

Convince Big Ten they belong in the Big Ten West.

Kansas

The Jayhawks’ next move will be a basketball hoist.

Kansas state

The Wildcats are tough. Hopefully the Big 12 will survive.

State of Oklahoma

Save the Big 12, but the cowboys need help.

TCU

The Horned Frogs offer the Dallas market, but which conference is right?

Texas Tech

The merger of Pac-12 and Big 12 would be the best scenario.

West Virginia

Time to check out the Big Ten or ACC superconferences.

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